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Hurricane Sandy Response - Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) Activities Report

Hurricane Sandy Activities Report
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Table of Contents


Summary1

Tropical Storm/Hurricane/Post Tropical Storm Sandy (Hurricane Sandy) started as a Tropical Storm in the Caribbean Sea and continued to follow a northward track up the United States eastern seaboard. On October 24, 2012, Tropical Storm Sandy became a Category I Hurricane, later peaking as a Category II strength hurricane. Hurricane Sandy continued to arc up the east coast, making landfall at about 8:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST) on October 29 in New Jersey. Hurricane Sandy grew to become the largest Atlantic hurricane on record and the second costliest in history; it affected 24 states with strong winds, heavy rain, coastal flooding, and snow in higher elevations.

Medical Reserve Corps MRC staff, both in the National office and in the regions, were engaged throughout the response by tracking and facilitating information flow in and out of the affected areas. MRC headquarters staff remained in close contact with MRC Regional Coordinators, who tracked MRC unit activities by directly communicating with regional partners, state partners, and local unit leadership. Local MRC units were also encouraged to enter their activity reports into their unit profiles. To gather data for this report, MRC compiled all MRC unit profile activities for the period of between October 24, 2012–January 11, 2013. Staff members then read through the reported activities and captured the reports that mentioned hurricane-related activities. Added to this compilation were relevant e-mails and reports that were forwarded by state and local coordinators prior to the cutoff date. MRC staff consolidated the submitted information into this report. It is important to note that at the time of writing many units are still engaged and those reporting activities are not captured herein.

As of January 11, 2013, 155 MRC units have reported preparedness and response activities related to Hurricane Sandy. The units that performed sheltering functions reported staffing and/or assisting in the setup of general community, functional, or special needs shelters and working at shelters in support of the American Red Cross (ARC). Units also indicated that they provided the community with health education, emergency communications support, and surge staffing to local hospitals, emergency management agencies, and public health departments. Volunteers in these units provided a total of 36,016 hours in community service, and units within the affected regions reported that they had more volunteers who were ready and willing to assist if needed. Additionally, many units that did not report Hurricane Sandy-related preparedness and response activities may have performed call-downs and notifications as part of their preparedness planning. An informal request for support was issued to the MRC listserv for volunteers who wanted to assist through the ARC. Reports of these activities, when provided, are also included in this report.

It is the intent of this report to give an overview of the Medical Reserve Corps network’s actions during the peak activity of this event. Due to the local nature of the Medical Reserve Corps, a true accounting of all of the events and activities is not possible at the Federal level.

1 Information for this summary narrative was extracted from data provided publicly on the National Weather Service’s National Hurricane Center Web site (http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2012/SANDY.shtml).

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Region I

Region 1 Activities Reported
General Sheltering Special/Functional Needs Shelter Support American Red Cross Shelter Operations Warming Station Communications Surge Staffing Provide Health Education Other
38 2 10 5 8 6 4 33

Connecticut

  • Bridgeport MRC (Bridgeport, CT). Thirteen (13) MRC volunteers served approximately 210 hours at the Emergency Operations Center as well as at our four emergency shelters. Five MRC volunteers operated a distribution center for those affected by the storm, serving 521 community members.

  • Fairfield Easton MRC (Fairfield, CT). Twenty-two (22) members of the MRC provided staffing for a shelter opened in response to the hurricane. More than 500 residents were provided shelter during the 9 nights the municipal shelter was open. Nearly 98 percent of the town was without power; it took 7 days to restore power to those homes not damaged by the storm or flooding. MRC members also volunteered at the Fairfield Call Center to answer calls from residents seeking information or services. The call center remained open for 12 days and received thousands of calls. The total volunteer contribution was 292 hours of service.

  • Greenwich MRC (Greenwich, CT). Fifteen (15) MRC volunteers contributed 120 hours of service at the Western Civic Center Shelter/Warming Center, which was operated by the Greenwich Department of Health. The shelter directly served over 200 residents, with 48 clients at the peak of shelter operations.

  • Ledge Light Health District MRC (New London, CT). One physician, three MRC nurses, and one non-medical volunteer activated to two shelters on the shoreline in support of the ARC, serving approximately 400 community members.

  • MRC at Yale New Haven (New Haven, CT). The MRC unit coordinator maintained communications with local community leaders to assess needs during the storm.

  • Milford MRC (Milford, CT). Approximately 17 MRC volunteers contributed 216 hours, in shifts, to cover a round-the-clock schedule for approximately 91 consecutive hours. Volunteers filled a variety of roles within the incident command structure. The majority of the 120 shelter visitors were without electricity in their home for four days. The MRC volunteer coordinator staffed a scaled-down version of the warming center when a Nor’easter blew through immediately following the storm, and a school nurse volunteered 6.5 hours. The MRC Volunteer Coordinator also attended weekly City Hall Disaster Recovery meetings.

  • Naugatuck Valley MRC (Seymour, CT). Six (6) MRC members were called to assist at warming stations, to work at shelters, and to help with commodity distributions, providing a total of 24 volunteer hours. At least 60 community members were directly served. MRC members also assisted a local ambulance company with home visits to the elderly.

  • Pomperaug Health District MRC (Southbury, CT). Ten (10) MRC volunteers staffed Red Cross supported shelters in the towns of Southbury and Oxford. The MRC volunteers contributed approximately 50 volunteer hours of service.

  • Shoreline MRC (Branford, CT). Nine (9) MRC volunteers were activated to support shelters as medical staff as well as assist in commodities distribution at three local schools, the Guilford Community Center, and the Branford Community House. Eighty-six (86) hours of service were donated and approximately 250 community members were served.

  • Stratford-Trumbull-Monroe MRC (Stratford, CT). The Stratford-Trumbull-Monroe MRC activated 6 medical volunteers and 8 non-medical volunteers to staff a shelter throughout Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath from October 28–November 2, 2012. The volunteers contributed a total of 249 volunteer hours and provided comfort and medical care to 160 shelter residents. Some residents required around-the-clock monitoring. Without the services of the MRC members, many of these individuals may have needed to be admitted to local hospitals.

  • Torrington Area Health District MRC (Norfolk, CT). Twelve (12) members of the MRC were placed on standby for a local general needs shelter. No volunteers were utilized.

  • Uncas Health District MRC (Norwich, CT). Five (5) MRC nurses and the unit coordinator staffed a regional shelter upon request of the Norwich Emergency Management. The shelter served 45 clients, primarily the homeless and trailer park evacuees. The nurses conducted intake assessments, counseled anxious clients, and assisted with oxygen tank maintenance. Another nurse was activated to a second shelter. The MRC also reported that seven volunteers (four nurses, an EMT, and two non-medicals) worked at the East Lyme Middle School shelter to assist the Ledge Light Health District MRC unit, which was busy staffing the Groton High School shelter in serving 50 local residents affected by power outages and storm damage. The 11 volunteers served a total of 286 volunteer hours in support of the ARC managed shelters.

  • West Haven Department of Public Health (West Haven, CT). The Unit Coordinator was involved in Emergency Operations Center (EOC) and Shelter Operations Activation for the response.

  • Westport Weston Wilton MRC (Westport, CT). Twenty four (24) MRC members worked with Community Emergency Response Teams (CERT) partners and town departments to open and support shelters, food distribution, warming, and charging and participated in shelter management and operations. In Westport overnight shelters housed up to 83 individuals who were medically fragile and/or needed electricity for oxygen delivery for 3 days plus 20 people for an additional 4 days/nights. About 40 additional residents came for warming, charging, and food. In Weston, an overnight shelter was open for 3 nights for 8 residents, but saw 1700 visits from residents over an 8-day period for food, warming, and charging.

Maine

  • Central Maine MRC (North Monmouth, ME). Fifteen (15) MRC volunteers were placed on standby to provide assistance for storm-related response.

  • Northeastern Maine Medical Reserve Corps (Brewer, ME). The MRC unit utilized MaineHAN Alert (part of the Health Alert Network) to alert the region to the Healthcare (HC) Planning conference call for response to Hurricane Sandy. The volunteers came together to assemble AMS Functional Needs Medical Sheltering Kits in preparation for deployment. The NE-MRC facilitated and participated in conference calls with regional HC partners to discuss the preparation of the state for Hurricane Sandy and to identify issues and concerns. HC organizations were provided with materials to assist in the physical and operational preparations for the hurricane.

Massachusetts

  • Amherst Health Department (Amherst, MA). Two (2) volunteers assisted with shelter operations during the storm, contributing 40 hours of volunteer service.

  • Berkshire MRC (Great Barrington, MA). The MRC conducted an internal Hurricane Sandy Communications/Activation preparation drill.

  • Boston MRC (Boston, MA). The MRC sent unit members an advisory notice alerting them of Hurricane Sandy and the possible need for volunteers. Nine (9) MRC members participated in sheltering operations training in order to be able to staff and operate an emergency shelter if necessary. Twelve (12) volunteers participated in an Introduction to the Emergency Tracking System.

  • Bridgewater Area MRC (Bridgewater, MA). Six (6) MRC volunteers were activated to staff a Red Cross Shelter located at Bridgewater Raynham High School, which serviced Plymouth County, providing a total of 72 volunteer hours.

  • Burlington Volunteer Reserve Corps (Burlington, MA). Seven (7) volunteers participated in emergency preparedness training regarding individuals with disabilities in a shelter.

  • Cape Cod MRC (Barnstable, MA). Fifty (50) medical and nonmedical MRC volunteers worked the Sandwich, Dennis, Yarmouth, and Nauset Shelters. The volunteers staffed the medical aspects of all the regional shelters on Cape Cod and Martha’s Vineyard. All shelter coverage included a non-medical team leader, at least 1-3 RNs, MD, PA, paramedic, EMT, and 2 unlicensed support volunteers. Some clients would need to be hospitalized if MRC services were not available in the shelter. Six (6) of the volunteers did a 24-hour shift. The shelters served 18 residents and the volunteers provided an estimated total of 366 volunteer hours. Immunizations were also provided to 10 AmeriCorps members going to relief efforts. The MRC also participated with the Barnstable County Regional Emergency Planning Committee and the Shelter subcommittee to draft an after-action report on Hurricane Sandy and conduct other planning and coordination efforts to improve future responses.

  • City of Springfield, MA Health and Human Services MRC (Springfield, MA). The MRC held an infectious diseases and sheltering exercise.

  • Duxbury Bay Area Regional MRC (Duxbury, MA). Five (5) MRC volunteers worked at the Hurricane Sandy emergency operations shelter reception center and the Emergency Operations Center to help residents until they were able to be served at the regional shelter or other accommodations could be made. Twenty (20) community members were served and 12 volunteer hours were contributed to the response.

  • Franklin Regional Council of Governments (Greenfield, MA). Seven (7) MRC volunteers participated in an exercise involving a severe storm scenario that resulted in the need for nurses at shelters and surge facilities. This exercise tested the unit’s ability to contact and deploy nurses, utilize the MA Responds system to use the mission development and tracking system, and respond to a state call-up.

  • Greater New Bedford MRC (Fairhaven, MA). Eight (8) MRC volunteers provided assistance for the Town of Dartmouth Shelter. The shelter served 8 residents. Three (3) MRC volunteers provided shelter coverage, with a nurse as well as two administrative personnel, at the Keith Middle School, and one volunteer provided 7.5 hours in support of the New Bedford Shelter. Additionally, two volunteers activated to the shelter in Acushnet. The volunteers contributed 47 volunteer hours to the effort.

  • Greater River Valley MRC (Andover, MA). MRC members were placed on standby for possible shelter operations.

  • Greater Taunton MRC (Taunton, MA). One (1) MRC volunteer was activated to assist the Bridewater MRC to staff an emergency shelter in response to Hurricane Sandy, providing 8 hours of service.

  • Greater Westfield & Western Hampden County MRC, Inc. (Westfield, MA). Three (3) MRC volunteers participated in a meeting at the Pioneer Valley Planning Commission to review the Shelter Operations draft manual for Western Massachusetts.

  • Hampden/Wilbraham MRC (Wilbraham, MA). Unit members spent a total of 10 hours making preparations for a potential emergency response to Hurricane Sandy and conducting internal and external communications between unit MRC Volunteers and community, state, and federal emergency response partners.

  • Hilltown MRC (Chesterfield, MA). Ten (10) MRC Disaster Animal Response Team members set up at a local shelter to accept animals from the people seeking safety in the human shelter during Hurricane Sandy. The volunteers contributed 150 hours of service.

  • Holyoke MRC (Holyoke, MA). Thirty (30) MRC volunteers participated in a shelter exercise at the Holyoke High School in order to demonstrate and train attendees in shelter setup.

  • Martha’s Vineyard MRC (Vineyard Haven, MA). The MRC unit coordinator and Behavioral Health Team Leader attended briefings with the Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency, Red Cross, and Duke’s County Emergency Manager concerning shelter activities. The MVMRC Board of Directors met to discuss Hurricane Sandy activities, including continuous contact with volunteers and the ARC concerning shelter operations, identifying gaps in staffing of shelters, the availability for MRC augmentation, and ongoing preparedness activities. Approximately 65 hours of service were provided.

  • Massachusetts Region 4A MRC (Lawrence, MA). The MRC Coordinator from Western MA and Region 4A volunteers staffed the shelter in West Springfield and 24 volunteers participated in a sheltering tabletop exercise.

  • Middleborough Area MRC (Middleborough, MA). Sixteen (16) MRC volunteers staffed a shelter, serving 17 residents and contributing a total of 966 volunteer hours. Additionally, 53 MRC volunteers were placed on standby in 6 other communities.

  • Nonotuck MRC (Easthampton, MA). Several MRC volunteers were scheduled and prepared for deployment at a local shelter for Hurricane Sandy. Operations ceased early because of lack of individuals needing services, and no deployment operations were performed.

  • Norfolk County 7 MRC (Needham, MA). The MRC participated in a regional tabletop exercise for sheltering needs.

  • North Shore-Cape Ann Emergency Preparedness Coalition MRC (Gloucester, MA). Six (6) MRC volunteers assisted in the sheltering efforts of the MRC, Red Cross, Lynn Public Health Commission, and other local emergency response partners. The volunteers provided a total of 48 volunteer hours serving eight community members and a dog. The MRC volunteers also participated in the Manchester Essex Shelter, Hamilton-Wehnam Shelter, and the Manchester-Essex Shelter team planning and training meetings.

  • South Hadley/Granby MRC (South Hadley, MA). MRC members were placed on standby for possible shelter operations.

  • Stoughton-Holbrook-Avon-Randolph MRC (Holbrook, MA). MRC members participated in 2 conference calls in preparation for Hurricane Sandy and four volunteers staffed the Holbrook Emergency Operations Center. The volunteers contributed 30 hours of service.

  • Topsfield Regional MRC (Topsfield, MA). The MRC participated in the Sheltering Subcommittee in Worcester, MA to prepare and plan for the MRC role during sheltering and conducted an emergency call-down to volunteers to gauge unit readiness for a potential hurricane response.

  • Town of Longmeadow MRC (Longmeadow, MA). Three (3) MRC volunteers provided a total of 4 hours of volunteer time, making 100 calls to local Individuals Requiring Additional Assistance Registry registrants to assist with appropriate storm preparations. Other MRC unit volunteers were placed on standby for deployment.

  • Town of Monson MRC (Monson, MA). The MRC held a Disaster Animal Rescue Team meeting for organizing and planning for sheltering of animals in the event of a disaster or other town emergency.

  • UMass Amherst MRC (Amherst, MA). MRC volunteers were scheduled for sheltering operations following Hurricane Sandy. The shelter was able to close early due to an indirect hit from the hurricane.

  • Upper Merrimack Valley MRC (Westford, MA). The MRC unit was poised to respond per forecasts of Hurricane Sandy. The unit sent awareness messages to all volunteers, including tips for their own storm preparedness. The unit activated one medical and three non-medical volunteers to a local warming center, providing 16 hours of service. MRC leaders also identified which responders had sheltering skills and experience with which to qualify for an ARC-requested deployment in groups of 10 to staff shelters in New York via the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC). This initiative was subsequently canceled. Unit leaders also presented at two senior citizen breakfasts to discuss emergency preparedness and the value of creating a 72-hour disaster kit.

  • Worcester Regional MRC (Worcester, MA). Twenty-seven (27) MRC volunteers were put on standby.

New Hampshire

  • Carroll County MRC (Center Ossipee, NH). The MRC volunteers were put on standby for potential deployment to support local sheltering needs.

  • Greater Derry MRC (Derry, NH). The MRC unit sent out volunteer notifications providing situational awareness for Hurricane Sandy and proffering preparedness actions for potential activation to support response operations, namely emergency sheltering.

  • Greater Exeter Region MRC (Exeter, NH). The MRC unit conducted nine Family Preparedness Workshops with approximately 100 total seacoast residents. Five (5) MRC volunteers were activated to staff a regional emergency shelter in North Hampton, NH in response to Hurricane Sandy and were placed on standby to staff a secondary emergency shelter in Exeter, NH.

  • Greater Manchester MRC (Manchester, NH). The MRC initiated a call-down via e-mail to members, asking for their availability to staff a shelter in anticipation of damage from Hurricane Sandy. Twenty (20) of the 40 members responded within 24 hours of the notice.

  • Greater Monadnock MRC (Keene, NH). Six (6) MRC volunteers were activated as part of the local Red Cross Shelter Response. The supply trailer was moved to the shelter for needed supplies and overnight staffing. The GMMRC activated 2 non-medical volunteers to staff an ARC shelter in response to Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath. Twenty-four (24) volunteer hours were contributed during this event.

  • Greater Portsmouth Region MRC (Exeter, NH). The MRC unit conducted nine Family Preparedness Workshops with approximately 100 total seacoast residents. Five (5) volunteers of the Greater Portsmouth Region Medical Reserve Corps (Exeter, NH) and the Greater Exeter/Portsmouth MRC members were activated to staff a regional emergency shelter in North Hampton, NH in response to Hurricane Sandy. They were placed on standby to staff a secondary emergency shelter in Exeter, NH. The shelter in North Hampton was opened only briefly with members contributing 2 hours of service and remaining on standby through October 30 for the secondary site.

  • Greater Sullivan County MRC (Unity, NH). The MRC unit initiated a call-down for Hurricane Sandy. Of the 18 active volunteers, one responded the same day, 12 responded within 24 hours, and one responded after 3 days.

  • Northern NH MRC (Littleton, NH). The MRC unit sent out a standby e-mail to their volunteers.

  • Pelham MRC (Pelham, NH). The MRC held a preplanning meeting and organized members for possible deployment. One volunteer attended 5 conference calls and manned the Emergency Operations Center during Hurricane Sandy contributing 18 hours of service.

  • Strafford County MRC (Dover, NH). The MRC Coordinator met with the Rochester Emergency Management Director (EMD), Assistant Fire Chief, and Mayor to debrief on the Hurricane Sandy shelter and discuss how to best prepare the City of Rochester for sheltering needs. Given the high frequency in which the shelter in Rochester has been opened over the past 5 years, the EMD, Asst. Chief, and Mayor all wanted to plan for the best way to prepare for the city’s sheltering needs. The Strafford County MRC has been relied upon heavily to assist with opening the city’s shelter, however, it is also being called upon by other communities in the region, so city leaders are working with the MRC Coordinator to develop a plan to best meet the city’s needs.

Rhode Island

  • Rhode Island MRC (West Greenwich, RI). Thirty-six (36) Functional Assessment Service Team (FAST) members were activated in response to Hurricane Sandy to respond to medical and functional needs in Rhode Island ARC Shelters. FAST teams were initiated to respond to the medical and/or functional needs of shelter residents. Eight (8) shelters were opened in Rhode Island and three mobile teams were staged to respond. The FAST team contributed 528 volunteer hours of service.

Vermont

  • MRC of Southwestern Vermont (Bennington, VT). The MRC unit alerted 31 volunteers. The alert staid, the Vermont Emergency Management Operations Center and the Department of Health Operations Center have been activated to a level III… At this time no activation is necessary for MRC volunteers...To keep updated see the Emergency Management Web site and the Dept of Health site with information on the storms track and how to prepare.

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Region II

Region 2 Activities Reported
General Sheltering Special/Functional Needs Shelter Support American Red Cross Shelter Operations Warming Station Communications Surge Staffing Provide Health Education Other
29 4 31 0 3 69 4 12

New Jersey

  • Atlantic County Public Health MRC (Northfield, NJ). In total, 3,000 residents and 30 pets were sheltered in Atlantic County. 1,500 additional residents were bused to state shelters. The ACPHMRC was activated on October 26, 2012. Twenty one (21) MRC volunteers were activated to county shelters from October 28–November 1. The shelters consisted of 1 medical needs shelter and 4 general population shelters. Three (3) shelters were pet-friendly. The volunteers contributed close to 400 volunteer hours. The Atlantic County Office of Emergency Management (OEM) medical shelter housed approximately 60 evacuees needing full-time medical attention. Thirteen (13) MRC volunteers worked in this shelter, including one MD, one pharmacist, one social worker, one nurse practitioner, five nurses, and five community volunteers. The other four shelters, located in middle schools and high schools in Buena and Pleasantville, housed general population shelters and were run jointly by ARC and the county. One (1) MRC nurse and two community volunteers helped staff the shelters in Pleasantville schools. Three (3) MRC nurses staffed the Buena school shelters. Many volunteers who were unable to deploy (due to illness, other responsibilities, or their own need to evacuate) assisted by sending messages and support to others and by collecting food and supplies for the distribution centers.

  • Bergen County MRC (Hackensack, NJ). Twenty-four (24) MRC volunteers, including 23 healthcare professionals and one member whose expertise is in public relations, were activated to three shelters which were open in the county as a result of Hurricane Sandy. These were the Red Cross Shelter at Bergen Community College (BCC), a Bergen County run shelter at the Juvenile Detention Center in Teterboro, and a Medical Needs county-run shelter in Paramus. The BCC Shelter and the Teterboro Shelter then combined and moved to the Police and Fire Academy in Mahwah. One BC MRC volunteer was a consultant for the animals at the BCC Shelter. Following the sheltering activities the BC MRC volunteers were put on standby in case they were needed for future recovery efforts. There were approximately 65 BC MRC members who were willing to be activated to help in this incident, and the MRC provided a total of 169.5 hours of service.

  • Burlington County MRC (Westampton, NJ). One hundred and seventeen (117) medical volunteers and 35 non-medical volunteers were used to staff three general ARC shelters and one medical needs shelter co-located with the ARC in response to Hurricane Sandy. The BCMRC provided around the clock care for 450 residents from Burlington, Monmouth, and Ocean Counties. The total number of hours contributed during the event was 1,776.

  • Camden County MRC (Blackwood, NJ). MRC volunteers were placed on alert and 23 volunteers were placed on standby status in order to be ready to support the local response to Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath. In response to a state request, four volunteers were activated to provide comfort and medical care to around 100 community members with and without medical conditions and physical limitations. An estimated 33 volunteer hours were contributed.

  • Cape May County MRC (Cape May Court House, NJ). Eleven (11) nurses were activated to three shelters in response to Hurricane Sandy at the request of OEM. The volunteers worked four 12-hour shifts during a 3-day period providing comfort and medical care to a total of 450 evacuees.

  • Cumberland MRC (Millville, NJ). Eight (8) MRC nurses and one non-medical volunteer helped staff two general population shelters in response to Hurricane Sandy at the request of the local emergency management agency. The MRC volunteers worked various shifts during a 3-day period. The MRC volunteered 43 hours to the local response.

  • Essex County Public Health Reserve Corps (Livingston, NJ). The MRC unit was placed on standby to assist with Hurricane Sandy as needed.

  • Greater Montclair Public Health Reserve Corps (Montclair, NJ). Twelve (12) MRC volunteers were activated for municipal shelter operations over the course of 12 days. Volunteers contributed 64 hours of service.

  • Gloucester County MRC (Sewell, NJ). The unit placed all volunteers on standby in preparation for Hurricane Sandy and organized and scheduled MRC nurses to help the Health Department staff a medical shelter. Due to the unexpected short duration of Hurricane Sandy, only one nurse was needed to cover a shift contributing 12 hours of service.

  • Hudson Regional Health Commission (Secaucus, NJ). Twenty-nine (29) volunteers were activated on a total of 44 assignments in both the Preparation and Response Phases to 11 sites throughout Hudson County, NJ. There were 28 placements of non-medical volunteers, contributing 345.75 hours of service. There were 16 placements of medical volunteers contributing 145.5 hours of valuable skills and expertise, for a total of 44 assignments equaling 4980.75 hours of service. Volunteers supported co-located medical needs shelters and general population shelters by providing medical support, translation, shelter management assistance, and food service assistance. They also assisted at a local medical center that set up Emergency Department Alternate Care Sites in two Hudson County towns. Volunteers assisted in the transportation of supplies and set up and staffed these two sites, which enabled the local hospital to keep valuable staff working at the regular emergency room even while the Alternate Care Sites were mobilized.

  • Hunterdon County MRC (Flemington, NJ). The MRC activated 20 volunteer health professionals (17 RNs, 3 MDs) to provide around-the-clock medical care in a Health Division-run Medical Support Center (MSC) co-located within an ARC ran regional evacuation shelter. The shelter, in a County facility, was opened by County OEM on October 28 but was managed by ARC from October 29 on. Initially the MSC had at least one nurse onsite 24 hours a day. The needs were such that after a few days the MRC staffed two nurses (or one nurse and one doctor) 24 hours a day. The MRC volunteer health professionals (VHPs) provided the largest proportion of MSC staffing. Supplemental staff was provided by county nurses, contract nurses, and a Red Cross nurse (during the second week). Four (4) of the MRC VHPs served twice; two served three times. Before it was learned that ARC would assume control of the general population shelter, they planned to deploy non-medical MRC members as well as VHPs, and five non-medical members initially signed up to help. When ARC took over, the volunteers offered to assist with non-medical MRC help, but ARC declined because they had enough staff to support the shelter. The volunteers who were able to serve provided 214.25 hours of service.

  • Manalapan CERT/MRC (Manalapan, NJ). MRC volunteers were active in two municipal shelters, sheltering around 20-25 persons during both days and nights. Volunteers also staffed the non-emergency Township storm phone line and maintained key communication services via ham radio operations. Volunteers also managed ice distribution and cell phone charging.

  • Mercer County MRC (Trenton, NJ). Four (4) MRC volunteers assisted at Hopewell Township Health Department’s reception center and staffed several shifts at the Union Fire Company in Titusville, contributing 30 hours of service.

  • Middlesex County MRC (New Brunswick, NJ). Seventy-seven (77) MRC volunteers supported the development of a Medical Needs Sheltering Plan; supported EOC operations at the County Emergency Operating Center; supported a combination medical needs shelter and ARC shelter at a church in Woodbridge, NJ; worked with RDF-3, DMAT FL-1, WI-1, and NY-2 in operations of a 257 bed Federal Medical Shelter at Middlesex County College; and provided support to the ARC at a regional shelter. The volunteers provided over 1,160 hours of community service.

  • Monmouth County Health Department MRC (Freehold, NJ). At least 60 MRC volunteers, many of whom did multiple shifts, were complimenting staffing at two state shelters and two local shelters. Monmouth University was at capacity with 1,500 individuals and Arthur Brisbane was housing 144 out of 300 individuals. Many individuals were staged at reception centers, waiting to enter shelters. Scheduling the volunteers was difficult due to limited power, travel limitations, and road conditions. Volunteers from Camden and Somerset were activated to assist Monmouth. As power was restored, the shelter population started to ease and there was less of a need for volunteers. The ARC, local public health facilities, and a federally staffed shelter were able to handle the shelter load. Logistical issues with pets (i.e., nowhere to move animals) held up the shelter closing. Volunteers contributed almost 1,000 hours of service.

  • Morris County MRC (Morristown, NJ). Morris County MRC responded to a request to support the Mennon Arena Red Cross Shelter. Forty-six (46) medical volunteers and 6 non-medical volunteers staffed one shelter in response to Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath from October 28–November 12. Morris County MRC provided Health Services staffing throughout the medical needs shelter. The MRC volunteers provided comfort and medical care to more than 100 community members and were on standby to receive out-of-county evacuees with chronic medical conditions which required around-the-clock monitoring. Without the services of the MRC members, many of these individuals may have needed to be admitted to the local hospital. A total of 550 volunteer hours were contributed during this event. One (1) medical volunteer and eight non-medical volunteers were activated to the 211 Call Center managed by the United Way. The total volunteer hours contributed during this event were 75 hours.

  • Ocean County MRC (Toms River, NJ). Twenty (20) MRC volunteers contributed 422 hours of service in a Medical Needs Shelter serving approximately 300 individuals during the Hurricane Sandy response.

  • Passaic County MRC (Paterson, NJ). The MRC unit was placed on standby.

  • Paterson MRC (Paterson, NJ). Three (3) MRC volunteers were activated to assist with response operations.

  • Salem County MRC (Salem, NJ). Eleven (11) volunteers assisted with setting up a medical needs shelter and supported shelter operations.

  • Somerset County (Somerville, NJ). Three (3) non-medical MRC volunteers contributed 24 hours of service when they were activated to the Somerset County and local OEM to assist with distributing information, water, and meals to the local population. Ten (10) non-medical volunteers staffed two municipal shelters and one volunteer went to the Monmouth County Brisbane shelter for 10 hours in response to Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath. The local municipal shelters where managed by the local OEM with assistance from the MRC and the ARC. A total of 246 volunteer hours were contributed throughout the event.

  • Sussex County MRC (Newton, NJ). Eighteen (18) medical and 2 non medical MRC volunteers activated to two separate shelter locations within Sussex County. The ARC and Hopatcong CERT managed the shelters. Sussex MRC volunteers provided all Health Services staffing at one shelter location and volunteers were assigned to a number of roles at both shelters. The total volunteer hours contributed during this event were 765.

  • Union County MRC (Westfield, NJ). The MRC volunteers assisted the Union County Office of Health Management in opening the Union County Regional Evacuation Shelter in the Cranford Community Center, Cranford, NJ. Fifty (50) MRC members volunteered more than 1,100 hours of service over a 2-week period to meet the unique needs of evacuees. The shelter provided accommodations for large families with young children, elderly residents with functional limitations, people with medical equipment, and families with pets. Bariatric cots were provided for larger clients who otherwise would have been directed to a special needs shelter. More than 675 residents came through the shelter doors. Evacuees included residents from 19 out of 21 county municipalities, out of county NJ residents, and out-of-state visitors. For the first 8 days the Union County MRC primarily staffed the shelter. Union County MRC volunteers worked side by side with the Salvation Army Disaster Response Team, Union County Human Services counselors, OEM staff, local police departments, and ARC response team members.

  • Warren County MRC (Oxford, NJ). Five (5) MRC volunteers were activated to assist; two volunteers assisted with water and ice distribution, one volunteer assisted with staffing phone lines in the EOC locally, and two volunteers provided support to Sussex County.

New York

  • Albany County MRC (Albany, NY). At the request of the Albany County OEM five volunteers were activated to assist in three municipal shelters across Albany County from October 29–30, contributing a total of 32 hours of service. The Albany County MRC also activated five volunteers via ServNY to assist with special needs shelter operations in Suffolk County from November 1–4, contributing a total of 180 hours of service.

  • Broome County Health Department (Binghamton, NY). Two (2) volunteers served 12 hours repacking and reorganizing special medical needs shelter go kits and supplies (e.g., cots, wheelchairs, commodes).

  • Clinton County MRC (Plattsburgh, NY). One (1) volunteer of Clinton County MRC was activated to assist in Hurricane Sandy recovery in New York City (NYC) from November 26–December 3 by providing staff wellness and health services with ARC at a staging warehouse, contributing 84 total volunteer hours during this deployment and serving approximately 100 community members.

  • Dutchess County NY MRC (Poughkeepsie, NY). Thirteen (13) volunteers assisted the ARC with shelter operations in three separate shelter locations over a 5-day period, contributing 90 hours of service. In addition, three volunteers assisted in the County’s EOC activation, contributing a total of 24 hours of service in 1 day.

  • Erie County Specialized Medical Assistance Response Team (SMART) (Buffalo, NY). Volunteers in Erie County were notified and activated via ServNY. Seven (7) medical volunteers were activated to assist the Nassau County Health Department in providing special needs shelter services in response to Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath from November 2–6. SMART members contributed a total of 336 volunteer hours. The SMART volunteers provided comfort and medical care to 110 Nassau County community members with chronic medical conditions that required around-the-clock monitoring. An additional seven volunteers were activated via NYS to assist the Suffolk County Health Department. ServNY was utilized for notification and activation of SMART volunteers for subsequent deployments, but the request was canceled.

  • NYC MRC (Queens, NY). During Hurricane Sandy 1,229 volunteers were activated with over 18,860 volunteer hours contributed. Activities included assisting with triage at 65 evacuation centers and medical and mental health support in 8 special needs medical shelters. Other unit members supported patient tracking (i.e., identifying nursing home patients and adding them to a database so their families can find them as they are moved). NYC MRC REST Team, the mental health disaster response team, provided mental health support at Restoration Centers through January 2, 2013. At the sheltering peak the MRC was providing 80–100 MRC volunteers daily for staffing.

  • Nassau County Department of Health MRC (Uniondale, NY). Two hundred thirty-six (236) MRC members have been activated in response to Hurricane Sandy resulting in 2948.5 hours of volunteer professional service to community members. Volunteers were assigned to the Health Department Special Needs shelters. The MRC was a significant portion of the medical support provided during the first week after the storm at the nine ARC general population shelters. The above volunteer support does not include any service by DMAT teams or by the 17 out-of-County ServNY healthcare volunteers that were activated by the State to Nassau County and housed in the MRC office. Lastly, 12 members of the Nassau County MRC supported the response to Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath on November 20 by providing assistance with a TDAP POD for first responders. The total volunteer hours contributed during this event were 35.50.

  • Niagara County MRC (Niagara Falls, NY). MRC volunteers were notified that the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) was seeking deployment of additional volunteers in response to Hurricane Sandy.

  • Orange County MRC (Goshen, NY). Nine (9) MRC volunteers were activated to assist at the EOC in response to Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath. In total the volunteers served 101 hours during the storm surge and the recovery process.

  • Putnam County MRC (Brewster, NY). Twelve (12) volunteers served 120 volunteer hours, providing comfort and shelter staffing to assistance to several hundred residents in non medical shelters and comfort stations.

  • Saratoga County MRC (Saratoga, NY). MRC volunteers were notified that NYSDOH was seeking deployment of additional volunteers in response to Hurricane Sandy.

  • Schenectady County MRC (Schenectady, NY). Twenty-six (26) MRC Volunteers were scheduled for shelter staffing and placed on standby in the event that shelters were needed. Shelters were not activated in Schenectady County.

  • Suffolk County MRC (Yaphank, NY) Forty-eight (48) MRC volunteers were activated and served by contacting over 600 individuals on Suffolk’s special needs registry informing individuals of the storm’s potential impact and the need to shelter in place or seek shelter. Volunteers supported four ARC shelters and one special needs shelter and aided in the promotion of the county social media statements and key program items (code red and special needs registry) to friends, family, clients, and others. Thirty (30) medical MRC volunteers were received via ESAR-VHP deployment to support shelter operations. Six (6) members of the MRC supported the response to Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath on November 20 by providing assistance with a TDAP and Flu POD for first responders and at risk communities. One (1) member served as a virtual deployment coordinator of volunteers for a 13-day period of operation. Three (3) members provided client-based well checks and initial case management within their communities. The total volunteer hours contributed during this event were 696.

  • Yates County MRC (Penn Yan, NY). MRC volunteers were notified that NYSDOH was seeking deployment of additional volunteers in response to Hurricane Sandy in the NY metropolitan area. One (1) volunteer expressed willingness to deploy but the request for that help was cancelled. No weather-related concerns were noted in this local area.

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Region III

Region 3 Activities Reported
General Sheltering Special/Functional Needs Shelter Support American Red Cross Shelter Operations Warming Station Communications Surge Staffing Provide Health Education Other
15 2 10 0 2 1 5 4

Delaware

  • Delaware Health and Human Service MRC (Symrna, DE). Thirty-six (36) volunteers assisted at the seven shelters, including a special needs shelter, that were opened throughout the state of Delaware. The volunteer base consisted of physicians, RNs, NPs, LPNs, and support staff.

Maryland

  • MD Responds Statewide MRC. One-hundred and thirty-six (136) MRC volunteers indicated availability for deployment to assist with state shelter operations. MD Responds activated 45 medical and mental health professionals to staff three state shelter operations and one county shelter operation, providing a total of 528 volunteer hours.

  • MD Defense Force MRC—Emergency Volunteers (Towson, MD). Thirty-Five (35) MRC volunteers indicated availability to deploy if necessary, providing 144 volunteer hours and nursing support to four National Guard ambulances.

  • Prince George’s County Health Department MRC (Largo, MD). Seven (7) MRC volunteers were available to assist with sheltering operations. The MRC volunteers provided 168 volunteer hours and served 23 community members.

Pennsylvania

  • Allentown Volunteer MRC (Allentown, PA). Twenty-five (25) volunteers activated in collaboration with ARC to staff two shelters, one at Allentown Agricultural Hall and one at Allentown Dieruff High School, providing over 120 volunteer hours.

  • Bucks County MRC (Doylestown, PA). Fifteen (15) MRC volunteers staffed emergency shelters in collaboration with the ARC, providing 168 volunteer hours serving 166 community members.

  • Chester County MRC (West Chester, PA). Twenty-two (22) MRC volunteers staffed emergency shelters in collaboration with the American Red Cross, providing 75 volunteer hours and serving 264 community members.

  • City of Bethlehem MRC (Bethlehem, PA). Eight (8) MRC volunteers staffed an emergency shelter, providing 72 volunteer hours and serving affected community members at the Allentown Dieruff High School.

  • Erie Regional MRC (Erie, PA). The MRC utilized the heightened awareness in the community due to the media attention related to Hurricane Sandy to educate 1,200 MRC members and their families on the need to have a personal preparedness plan and kit. A supply checklist and links to keep informed of the weather situation were also made available.

  • Montgomery County MRC (Norristown, PA). MRC volunteers were placed on alert for possible deployment.

  • Southern Alleghenies EMS Council MRC—Fulton Division (McConnelsburg, PA). Ten (10) MRC volunteers staffed the health services area of two ARC shelters (McConnellsburg, and Cassville) during Hurricane Sandy, providing 20 volunteer hours.

  • Southern Alleghenies EMS Council MRC—Huntingdon Division (Huntingdon, PA). Four (4) MRC volunteers staffed the health services area for an ARC shelter during Hurricane Sandy, providing 24 volunteer hours.

Virginia

  • Chesapeake MRC (Chesapeake, VA). The MRC was activated and received a request for five MRC nurses to lead staff at the City of Chesapeake Special Medical Needs (SMN) shelter in response to Hurricane Sandy. The CMRC Program Coordinator was the point of contact for coordinating staffing and shift changes at the local Health Department. Volunteers contributed 60 service hours. Shelter staffing included CMRC nurses, CSB Social Workers (administrative support), and EMS personnel as well as security provided by Chesapeake Police.

  • Eastern Shore MRC (Accomac, VA). One (1) MRC volunteer worked over 20 hours in an Accomack County shelter, where over 200 residents sought shelter during Hurricane Sandy on the Eastern Shore.

  • Henrico County MRC (Henrico, VA). Two (2) MRC volunteers contributed 12 hours in support of local phone bank operations.

  • Norfolk MRC (Norfolk, VA). Nine (9) MRC volunteers were activated to assist with first aid at a local shelter; reach out to 200 members of a Special Needs Registry to discuss individual preparedness plans and offer assistance as needed; work alongside the emergency planner testing, issuing, and cleaning communication radios; assist in inventory of shelter medical kits/supplies; call Long Term Care facilities regarding disaster preparedness plans. In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, MRC volunteers followed up with the registrants of the Special Needs Registry to ensure that needs were met.

  • Peninsula MRC (Newport News, VA). Two (2) nurse volunteers were sent to administer basic first aid and conduct health needs assessments for individuals with medical special needs at the Grafton High School Shelter in York County, VA. The nurses contributed 17 hours of service at the shelter. Volunteer nurses also provided comfort and medical care to 10 members of the York County community with chronic medical conditions, relieving pressure from the local hospital. Nine (9) MRC volunteers contributed 73 hours of service at the Phenix School Shelter in Hampton, VA. The shelter was set up to assist people seeking refuge from the storm due to flooding. Fifty (50) community members utilized the shelter. Six (6) members of the MRC participated in partner agency shelter training where information was shared with partner agency shelter workers, which will result in providing quality service to clients at local area shelters.

  • Rappahannock-Rapidan MRC (Culpeper, VA). Several volunteers attended the ARC Shelter Training. RRMRC volunteers were requested to stand by for potential sheltering.

  • Virginia Beach MRC (Virginia Beach, VA). Four (4) VBMRC volunteers worked with two school nurses at the Birdneck Elementary School shelter in the clinic area for the City of Virginia Beach. Three (3) other VBMRC volunteers were on standby to relieve the volunteers if the shelter stayed open beyond expectations. The volunteers provided approximately 90 hours of community service.

West Virginia

  • Eastern Panhandle MRC (Martinsburg, WV). MRC volunteers were placed on standby to potentially provide support to ARC shelters.

  • Harrison County MRC (Clarksburg, WV). Volunteers were requested to help staff shelters in two locations in Tucker County, WV by performing basic tasks as well as providing comfort to evacuees due to continued power outages related to Hurricane Sandy. The ARC provided meals.

  • Jackson County MRC (Ripley, WV). The MRC unit distributed preparedness information related to Hurricane Sandy at a county fair.

  • Mineral County MRC (Keyser, WV). Three (3) MRC volunteers staffed an information table set up at a local Oktoberfest event. Capitalizing on the education opportunity presented by the media coverage of Hurricane Sandy, the unit distributed Ready.gov preparedness information to citizens. Three (3) MRC volunteers worked with the ARC to set up and staff the Red Cross Shelter at Fire Station #2 in Keyser, WV for people affected by Hurricane Sandy. In total the volunteers contributed 32 hours of service during this event.

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Region IV

Region 4 Activities Reported
General Sheltering Special/Functional Needs Shelter Support American Red Cross Shelter Operations Warming Station Communications Surge Staffing Provide Health Education Other
0 0 2 0 1 1 0 12

Georgia

  • Chatham County MRC (Savannah, GA). The unit coordinator sent a notice to members to continue monitoring Hurricane Sandy and prepare for deployment if needed. The unit maintained standby status (24 hour readiness) for 5 days beginning on October 27.

  • East Metro Health District MRC (Dacula, GA). Twenty-three (23) volunteers participated in a hurricane preparedness tabletop exercise. The exercise resulted in the volunteers learning how to prepare for loss of usual services, especially utilities; how to better plan for both sheltering in place and evacuation; and the best gadgets and equipment to assist in such situations. Members are now better prepared for a disaster and better prepared to convey the knowledge to their own communities.

Kentucky

  • Ashland Boyd County Catlettsburg MRC (Ashland, KY). The unit placed the volunteers on alert by request of the local OEM for possible shelter openings in response to Hurricane Sandy.

  • Bullitt County MRC (Shepherdsville, KY). Two (2) volunteers prepared by performing an inventory on the shelter trailer and posted pictures on the unit’s Facebook page.

  • Floyd County MRC (Prestonsburg, KY). The MRC Coordinator and three volunteers participated in ARC Shelter Training. The MRC unit also participated in a statewide MRC drill and live event to test the response preparedness for possible impacts from Hurricane Sandy.

  • Green River District MRC (Owensboro, KY). Four (4) volunteers participated in shelter training with the DCCHC that included the roles the MRC would fill in an emergency as well as the MRC’s expected interface with Public Health and the ARC. The unit also provided shelter training to staff in Henderson County.

  • Hopkins County MRC (Madisonville, KY). The MRC unit participated in the statewide MRC drill and live event to test their response preparedness for possible impacts from Hurricane Sandy.

  • KY Region One MRC (Paducah, KY). The MRC unit participated in the statewide MRC drill and live event to test their response preparedness for possible impacts from Hurricane Sandy.

  • Lake Cumberland District MRC (Somerset, KY). The LCDHD MRC Unit Leader participated in a meeting with the Louisville Chapter Red Cross and Emergency Response members from Taylor and Green counties to discuss availability of assets for our district/region and the expectations for each group during the need for shelter or disaster assistance. The MRC unit also participated in the statewide semi-annual KHELPS/MRC drill, where members were notified via KHELPS and asked for deployment availability during Hurricane Sandy.

  • Lawrence County (Louisa, KY). The MRC unit participated in the Statewide MRC drill and live event to test their response preparedness for possible impacts from Hurricane Sandy. The unit participated in the drill and then went on standby as the outer fringe of the Hurricane brushed the county. Fifteen (15) volunteer hours were contributed.

  • Lincoln County MRC (Stanford, KY). Participated in the call-down drill related to Hurricane Sandy.

North Carolina

  • MidCarolina State Medical Assistance Team (Chapel Hill, NC). The MRC issued Hurricane Sandy notifications to unit volunteers to continue monitoring the storm system and prepare for deployment if needed. Medical sheltering and strike team mission packages were configured initially for an instate deployment and later reconfigured for a possible EMAC outside of North Carolina.

  • Mountain Regional MRC Unit (East Flat Rock, NC). The unit was on standby to support staffing (medical and non-medical) for general population shelters and medical aid stations in NY, NJ, and PA. Members participated in ARC Disaster Overview/Shelter Operations courses. Verification of credentials and an application process also took place.

  • North Carolina Baptist Men MRC Central Region (Cary, NC). Fifteen (15) volunteers provided first aid to NCBM Disaster Relief Volunteers serving in NJ and NY after Hurricane Sandy. Volunteer contribution hours totaled approximately 1,500, with 77 patient visits.

South Carolina

  • Lowcountry MRC (North Charleston, SC). Lowcountry MRC received a request from the ARC for volunteers to assist in response efforts for Hurricane Sandy. ARC contact information and instructions on how to volunteer were forwarded to LMRC volunteers. One (1) medical volunteer, who is also an ARC volunteer, activated to Long Island, NY with the ARC to support shelter services. The total volunteer hours contributed during this event was 120.

  • South Carolina Edisto Savannah MRC (Aiken, SC). The ARC contacted the South Carolina Edisto Savannah MRC to request volunteers available for activation for Hurricane Sandy recovery efforts.

  • Western Piedmont MRC (Anderson, SC). The ARC contacted the Western Piedmont MRC requesting that volunteers cross train with ARC for deployment to Hurricane Sandy recovery sites. Twelve (12) MRC volunteers completed training. Two (2) MRC nurses and a non-medical MRC volunteer activated to New York and New Jersey, contributing over 420 volunteer hours of service.

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Region V

Region 5 Activities Reported
General Sheltering Special/Functional Needs Shelter Support American Red Cross Shelter Operations Warming Station Communications Surge Staffing Provide Health Education Other
0 0 2 0 1 0 1 5

Illinois

  • Jo Daviess County Health Department Emergency Volunteers MRC (Galena, IL). Two (2) MRC members were activated to assist with Hurricane Sandy disaster relief with the ARC. Upon their return the activated volunteers educated other members by sharing their experiences.

  • Macoupin County MRC (Gillespie, IL). One (1) MRC member supported the response to Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath from December 8–27, 2012, by providing assistance at a disaster recovery center. The volunteer provided referrals for different services such as mental health; she also worked at a booth where snacks and food were distributed. The total volunteer hours contributed during this event were 100 hours.

Indiana

  • Vanderburgh County MRC (Evansville, IN). The MRC invited a FEMA representative that lives in the MRC’s local community to present on the Hurricane Sandy response. This presentation provided a learning opportunity for the MRC volunteers to understand the scope of response needs following a disaster.

Minnesota

  • Central Minnesota Responds MRC (Cambridge, MN). Seven (7) MRC volunteers participated in the ARCs Health Services training and three medical volunteers members were activated to locations in New York (shelter in Nassau County; DRCs at Rockaway, Long Beach, and Brighton Beach; canvassing at Rockaways; shelters/Hot Shots and Outreach in Staten Island, Far Rockaway, Breezy Point area) with the ARC-Minnesota to support Health Services. The total volunteer hours contributed during this event were 375.

  • Countryside Swift County MRC (Benson, MN). The MRC distributed communications to all unit members to determine their availability for potential Hurricane Sandy response.

  • MRC of Carver County (Chaska, MN). The local unit coordinator conducted an e-survey via Minnesota Responds of the unit’s registered nurses to obtain a soft count of those RNs willing to volunteer in the Hurricane Sandy response somewhere in the East Coast area. MRC volunteers were poised to provide the support needed in the Eastern United States.

  • MRC of Washington County (Stillwater, MN). Three (3) MRC volunteers were activated with the ARC. Two (2) volunteers staffed shelters in response to Hurricane Sandy, providing 170 volunteer hours. These volunteers provided direct care for more than 100 community members that were displaced from their homes in the affected area. A third volunteer was activated to provide supervisory management of in-kind donations to the ARC warehouse in the New Jersey area. The volunteer contributed 150 hours during this event.

Ohio

  • Summit County MRC (Stow, OH). MRC volunteers were placed on standby for possible deployment in response to Hurricane Sandy.

  • Franklin County and Columbus MRC (Columbus, OH). MRC volunteers were placed on standby for possible deployment in support of the ARC.

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Region VI

Region 6 Activities Reported
General Sheltering Special/Functional Needs Shelter Support American Red Cross Shelter Operations Warming Station Communications Surge Staffing Provide Health Education Other
0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0

Oklahoma

  • Oklahoma Region 7—Tulsa County MRC (Tulsa, OK). Two (2) MRC members were activated with OK1-DMAT and provided care in several shelters for elderly, chronically ill, and displaced citizens of New York and New Jersey.

  • Oklahoma Region 8—Oklahoma County MRC (Oklahoma City, OK). Two (2) MRC members activated with OK1-DMAT and provided a total of 115 volunteer hours. At least 336 community members in the affected areas were directly served. The team provided care in several shelters for elderly, chronically ill, and displaced citizens of New York and New Jersey.

Region VII

Region 7 Activities Reported
General Sheltering Special/Functional Needs Shelter Support American Red Cross Shelter Operations Warming Station Communications Surge Staffing Provide Health Education Other
0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1

Missouri

  • Monroe County Health Department MRC (Paris, MO). The MRC invited a local ARC volunteer who activated in response to Hurricane Sandy to be a guest speaker at their January 2013 meeting. This meeting provided a learning opportunity about real-life deployments to large disasters.

Nebraska

  • Eastern Nebraska Western Iowa MRC (Omaha, NE). One (1) behavioral health volunteer served as a responder, sent with the ARC to provide service to Hurricane Sandy survivors.

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Region IX

Region 9 Activities Reported
General Sheltering Special/Functional Needs Shelter Support American Red Cross Shelter Operations Warming Station Communications Surge Staffing Provide Health Education Other
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

California

  • San Luis Obispo County MRC (San Luis Obispo, CA). Four (4) MRC members were activated and served in the response with the ARC in response to Hurricane Sandy, providing a total of 200 volunteer hours and serving 500 community members in the affected area by providing needed medical services.

  • UC Davis Veterinary Emergency Response Team MRC (Davis, CA). The UC Davis Veterinary Emergency Response Team utilized the heightened awareness in the community due to the media attention related to Hurricane Sandy to train volunteers on Emergency Animal Sheltering: Veterinary Considerations. A total of 50 MRC volunteers supported this event, contributing 50 total volunteer hours.

Region X

Region 10 Activities Reported
General Sheltering Special/Functional Needs Shelter Support American Red Cross Shelter Operations Warming Station Communications Surge Staffing Provide Health Education Other
0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3

Oregon

  • Jackson County MRC (Medford, OR). Two (2) MRC members responded to Hurricane Sandy. One (1) volunteer was activated with the ARC while the other volunteer served with the Oregon DMAT.

Washington

  • Northwest Tribal Emergency Management Council MRC (Snohomish, WA) The MRC posted critical information and updates regarding Hurricane Sandy to NTEMC Web site (http://www.ntemc.org/) as well as to the NWTEMC and NTEMC Facebook pages and social media outlets.

  • MRC of Eastern Washington (Spokane, WA). Two (2) MRC Mental Health Professionals responded with the ARC to NYC for 14 days, providing 160 volunteer hours and serving 100 community members in the affected area.

  • Tulalip Tribes MRC (Tulalip, WA). One (1) MRC member was activated and went with the ARC to NYC, providing 50 volunteer hours and serving 168 community members in the affected area.

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Appendix A

Summary of Activities Reported, by Region
State General Sheltering Special/
Functional Needs Shelter
Support American Red Cross Shelter Operations Warming Station Communications Surge Staffing Provide Health Education Other
Region 1 Activities Reported                
Connecticut 15 2 5 4 2 3   6
Maine                
Massachusetts 12   3 1 3 1 3 15
New Hampshire 3   1   3 1 1 11
Rhode Island 8   1          
Vermont           1   1
Region 1 Totals 38 2 10 5 8 6 4 33
Region 2 Activities Reported                
New Jersey 26   15   2 2   2
New York 3 4 16   1 67 4 4
Region 2 Totals 29 4 31 0 3 69 4 6
Region 3 Activities Reported                
Delaware 6 1            
Maryland 5             1
Pennsylvania 1   7          
Virginia 3 1     2 1   3
West Virginia     3          
Regional 3 Totals 15 2 10 0 2 1 0 4
Region 4 Activities Reported                
Georgia               1
Kentucky         1     8
North Carolina           1   1
South Carolina     1         2
Regional 4 Totals 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 12
Region 5 Activities Reported                
Illinois               2
Indiana             1  
Minnesota     2   1     3
Ohio                
Region 5 Totals 0 0 2 0 1 0 1 5
Region 6 Activities Reported                
Oklahoma   2            
Region 6 Totals 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0
Region 7 Activities Reported                
Missouri           0   1
Nebraska           1   0
Regional 7 Totals 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
Region 9 Activities Reported                
California               2
Region 9 Totals 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Region 10 Activities Reported                
Oregon               1
Washington         1     2
Region 10 Totals 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3
Grand Totals 82 10 54 5 16 78 13 66

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Appendix B

Regional Breakdown of Volunteer Hours, Counts, and Community Members Served
Region Volunteer Count Volunteer Hours Community Members Served Unit Count
Region 1 607 3,945.5 4,420 58
Region 2 2,365 26,662.7 4,104 38
Region 3 251 1,623.0 913 23
Region 4 66 2,415.0 77 17
Region 5 16 795.0 - 9
Region 6 4 115.0 336 2
Region 7 1 - - 2
Region 9 54 250.0 500 2
Region 10 3 210.0 268 4
Total 3,367 36,016.2 10,618 155

10/27/2017 3:25:45 PM